When at the Bill Hicks expo today, someone told me that military guns, like tank cannons, have gain-twist rifling.  When at the Remington booth, the product manager said that he pushed for gain-twist rifling in their guns, but was shot down due to the high cost of making it.  (Sounds to me like they don't have a machine design skill set on the TFG staff.) Maybe I'm on to something here with gain-twist being used in the XR45.  Can anyone confirm that gain twist is used in military guns?

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I was at my Gunsmith's shop today so I asked him what he knew.  His father was an armorer who retired from  The Rock Island Arsenal and was very familiar with their designs and manufacturing.

 He said to his knowledge nearly all the large arms incorporated gain twist rifling.   I asked if any small arms used it and he said none to his knowledge.

I know that the 460 S&W X-Frames use it but I know of no other small arms.

So, high-velocity, high performance guns use it.

Arne  -  If you have any specific questions, I am sure my Gunsmith would be happy to make some calls out to the Arsenal for you.

I thought current tank cannon bore is smooth.  I can believe major gun manufacturers would not want to go with gain twist rifling because it would point out that everything up to the point of rifling conversion was old, out of date or obsolete technology.  Boberg has several undeniable industry wide improvements in pocket pistol design.  Accuracy, power, recoil abatement and size optimization, all in a very stylish package.  I'll take one of everything, please!

Probably no need.  I'm thinking that light artillery had to do it so that trailer guns wouldn't rock sideways on their wheels during the shot.

Bob Cohee said:

Arne  -  If you have any specific questions, I am sure my Gunsmith would be happy to make some calls out to the Arsenal for you.

Smith and Wesson promotes the gain-twist rifling as a way to start the bullets "softer" in rotation and thus improving accuracy.  The 460 S&W Encores have conventional 1:20 twists and they break scopes.  Some shooters believe this is the true reason that Smith went with the 1:100 progressing to 1:20 rifling.

What you said is somewhat a similar scenario.

I have no clue how you got those numbers on Smith's progression.

I picked the numbers up off the S&W Forum a long time ago.  

I will have to say that I have never confirmed that with Smith.  If you look down the bore of a 460, the first 2"-3" does not appear to have any twist, so I believed it but never checked with anyone.

At 1:100, it may look like no twist at all.  On ours, it is absolutely no twist at the beginning.

It is common to use gain twist with large caliber projectiles (i.e. cannons) that having driving bands.  It helps keep the driving bands from shearing off the projectile during firing.  An example of this is the M61 Vulcan and the 20x102mm cartridge.  

I would bet some of us would buy gain twist barrels for our shorties if you get the process worked out for all of your barrels. Especially when you start shipping the Browning 50 cal shorty. Hey - only one shot; but it you hit something!

I would

alternety said:

I would bet some of us would buy gain twist barrels for our shorties if you get the process worked out for all of your barrels. Especially when you start shipping the Browning 50 cal shorty. Hey - only one shot; but it you hit something!

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