Please post your experiences, thoughts :) I'm using a Lee Turret press, I'm curious if the factory crimp die set is sufficient. Although I'm really interested in anything  that can be shared about reloading for this nifty little gun :) 

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It that a bullet or an artillery shell?

Ok, that's good news, at least it's an option for plinking rounds.

Do you have a similar solution for the 45acp round used in the xr45-s?

Hobknob said:

You are both correct.

Both the 9mm taper crimp and roll crimp dies only help, they don't eliminate the problem and you can still expect failures with every box you shoot.

Using the collet crimp die (from the Lee 357sig FCD) you can crimp it more than sufficient to keep any bullet in the case.

I tried this with a bunch of factory plinking loads as well as reloaded ammo. Just to satisfy my own curiosity, I took some of the hot rounds I loaded up for my "normal" guns and verified that they yank the casing off every time. Then I put a serious collet crimp on it and put a couple hundred rounds through it and didn't have a single separation.

The crimp physically deforms the bullet and creates its own cannelure of sorts, if you recover the bullet after shooting, there will still be a very visible ring indented into the bullet.

Here's a pic that shows what I'm talking about:

"Reseat" the bullets with a little "peen" from a ball peen hammer.



Hobknob said:

You are both correct.

Both the 9mm taper crimp and roll crimp dies only help, they don't eliminate the problem and you can still expect failures with every box you shoot.

Using the collet crimp die (from the Lee 357sig FCD) you can crimp it more than sufficient to keep any bullet in the case.

I tried this with a bunch of factory plinking loads as well as reloaded ammo. Just to satisfy my own curiosity, I took some of the hot rounds I loaded up for my "normal" guns and verified that they yank the casing off every time. Then I put a serious collet crimp on it and put a couple hundred rounds through it and didn't have a single separation.

The crimp physically deforms the bullet and creates its own cannelure of sorts, if you recover the bullet after shooting, there will still be a very visible ring indented into the bullet.

Here's a pic that shows what I'm talking about:

NEW HERE  so maybe this is a dumb question but    Why do you not factory crimp a lead ( hard cast bullet)  would this not have the same effect on holding power as the above 357 Sig crimp did ?

And does not all this additional crimping , beyond out of the box factory crimp , not increase pressure levels?    

so how do the ammo manufacturers get such a good crimp?  Surely they aren't crimping the rounds with a modified 357 die.

I have not shot my Bobergs yet so I can't answer to if it is the same as reloading for all of my other guns as I have done for many years.

I have found that when re-sizing for picky guns I will run the case through the size die twice. Especially if it was fired in a gun with a loose chamber and the brass expanded quite a bit.

Also when you bell the case mouth do it at the very minimum required to get bullet to start seating without stripping plating or bullet not going in the case perfectly straight. This will provide the most grab of the case on the bullet.

My 9mm, 357mag and 45 rounds all get a good crimp with my Lee FCD. I could put all my weight on it and get no pullet push back insuring I have a good crimp.

Lastly I think powder choice with this pistol will matter as well. Something slower burning like Power Pistol or CFE Pistol may work better for the action of this pistol then something like Unique which is a very fast burning powder with a sharp recoil pulse.

When I get around to breaking in my XR9 or XR45 I will try a magazine of my reloads and see if they cycle and load fine and report back.

I don't really shoot much bare lead so I can't comment on how it holds with a light crimp.

The modified 357sig (exact same bullet as a 9mm) crimp is just a collet crimp rather than a roll crimp or a taper crimp. You just can't buy a 9mm collet crimp off the shelf but I would assume that any ammo manufacturer could pretty readily buy or make a collet crimp die for 9mm if that's what they wanted to use.
Also, for most ammo, the crimp and neck tension is intended to prevent bullet setback. For that reason, some reloading dies tend to compress the brass a little bit extra so that when you bell the mouth and seat the bullet it expands the brass a little and you get a cartridge with a little bit of a waist.
That waist will help a lot with bullet setback, but it actually causes problems with the Boberg because it is squeezing the tail of the bullet, essentially trying to squirt the bullet out of the casing.
You rarely see a quality cartridge with a waist from the factory which may be one of the reasons why the higher-end/defensive ammo seems to have fewer issues with bullet pullout.

Internal pressure difference with a heavy crimp? I don't know how much difference it will actually cause. A light crimp will often improve the consistency of the rounds and your fps deviation will drop (perhaps because it creates a slightly higher, but more consistent release pressure). Relative to the tens of thousands of PSI, and how malleable brass is, I don't think it raises the pressure in a significant manner. Anecdotally, I have loaded up some really hot rounds and they performed great with no signs of overpressure. Whatever you do with a crimp, if you are consistent and work up your loadings with it included in the process, there shouldn't be any issues.

With regard to powder selection, I have tried a bunch of different powders and my current default for this is PowerPistol.
It works good, meters good, and will kick the bullets out as fast as you want them to go (if heavily crimped).
I took my XR9-L out this moring. 115gr Blazer Brass is no good. Every other shot it pulls bullet.
My reloads both 115gr and 124gr worked flawlessly. I also tried recrimping the Blazer with my Lee 9mm crimp die and that didn't work.
Both the Blazer bullets and mine measure .355 so that isn't the issue.
I think it's something to do with the case sizing prior to loading that is causing issues.

Yep. That's why there is an entire thread dedicated to which factory loaded rounds work, and which ones fail.

Also, I tried the same thing as you (crimping a factory round with a taper as well as with a roll crimp) and had them fail as well. The collet crimp however works just dandy on factory rounds that like to spontaneously disassemble.


Mike Caputo said:

I took my XR9-L out this moring. 115gr Blazer Brass is no good. Every other shot it pulls bullet.
My reloads both 115gr and 124gr worked flawlessly. I also tried recrimping the Blazer with my Lee 9mm crimp die and that didn't work.
Both the Blazer bullets and mine measure .355 so that isn't the issue.
I think it's something to do with the case sizing prior to loading that is causing issues.

The "Pro-Con" ammo thread has been dedicated for several years although each pistol has it's own attitude and is based upon each contributor's pistol's response to various loads. With the two Bobergs I have owned, I only had three separations over 1,500 rounds of factory ammo.  I would never use reloads in my carry pistol.   The question now is whether Bond will continued to support the Boberg repairs, provide parts or they will succumb to being collector's pistols.



mur.cap said:

The "Pro-Con" ammo thread has been dedicated for several years although each pistol has it's own attitude and is based upon each contributor's pistol's response to various loads. With the two Bobergs I have owned, I only had three separations over 1,500 rounds of factory ammo.  I would never use reloads in my carry pistol.   The question now is whether Bond will continued to support the Boberg repairs, provide parts or they will succumb to being collector's pistols.


I don't plan on using reloads for anything more than inexpensive practice.
I have loads made up with CFE Pistol and 124gr hollow points that mimic Hornady HST in both velocity and grouping. Better to practice with that then the real thing.

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